FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 6/22/17


Courtney Riddle
courtneyriddle@gmail.com
530-301-5974



Market Street Newsstands Taken Over By Artists For Weekend Pop-Up Festival

San Francisco, CA: The green newspaper kiosks dotting Market Street will swing open for Kiosk Fest, a weekend-long celebration of the printed word, to be held on September 1-2 from 10a-6p. The curated indie festival pulls together popular booksellers, printing presses, magazine publishers, zine distros and local writers to run their own pop-up shops, with books and art prints for sale, poetry readings, workshops, live music, and even a downtown scavenger hunt.

The fest will feature 49 vendors in 30 kiosks, and is returning for its second year. This time, Kiosk Fest is collaborating with San Francisco Zinefest, which will be held September 3 from 11a-6p. Together, the two events are creating a Labor Day Zine Celebration. Admission is free and the event is accessible.

"These old newsstands have been ignored for too long, and I can't think of a better way to reuse them," says organizer Courtney Riddle, owner of The Grand Newsstand. "I wanted to give artists a chance to highlight their craft, make new fans, and create unexpected arts in urban spaces."

Riddle will be distributing "passports" with an interactive map from her own full-time kiosk shop at the foot of Market Street. Festival-goers can check in at kiosks and collect stamps, redeemable for zines and prizes at The Grand Newsstand.

The newsstands are owned by advertising company JCDecaux, who has agreed to donate the space and allow artists to distribute their works for the weekend festival.

    Kiosk Fest details:
  • Date: September 1-2 from 10a-6p
  • Location: 30 newsstands along Market Street (between Embarcadero and 4th)
  • More info: kioskfest.thegrandnewsstand.com/
The Grand Newsstand is likely the smallest store in San Francisco, an independent book and zine shop housed in a repurposed newsstand on Market at Steuart Street. Opened by Courtney Riddle in 2015, it focuses on local and self-published works by working artists. It has been profiled twice in the San Francisco Chronicle, including a Datebook cover story.